• oid

    @Il-pleut That is pretty handy! A side note, probably best to use all lowercase in filenames in and out of the patch, different filesystems handle character case differently than OSXs HFS+, including the system this forum is on, so for me on linux when it downloads it saves the filename in all lowercase and breaks the patch. Seems the forum software converts the file name to all lowercase?

    posted in patch~ read more
  • oid

    @pharaoh-sean They do floats as well, hold shift while you change the value to get finner increments or bang a float into it and see.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @liamorourke Just remembered this guide https://github.com/megalon/pd-gui-examples . Does a great job and starts easy and works up to data structures.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @liamorourke I primarily learned from the stuff people here post over on the Abstractions forum, just scrolled through and downloaded anything I could not figure out and pulling it apart.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @cfry Those sorts of sounds can be gotten as well and a more sensitive mic will pick them up. The problem you are having is the mic is just getting noise, everything of the same volume, so nothing distinct for [sigmund~] to pick out, remember all those discrete sources add together. By wind noise I meant the sound of wind hitting a microphone directly, this creates a constant sound which will over power all those other sounds, not the sound of wind rustling the leaves in a tree. A good wind screen will be very helpful for you here, but you need to remember, a windscreen does reduce mic sensitivity, so there is a trade off, increase mic sensitivity and the more wind noise it picks up, put on a denser wind screen and you loose some of that sensitivity. A pop screen could work better since it can be placed between the wind and the mic, the other sides of the mic are left open, but if the wind shifts you could end up with wind noise overpowering everything and have to reposition the screen. If you limit yourself to days with nothing more than light winds, you should be able to get by with just a light windscreen and not suffer much loss in sensitivity.

    My knowledge of windscreens and pop screens and the like is fairly limited and largely theoretical, I have little hands on use of these things as I mostly record in more controlled environments or in situations where I have more leeway than your needs allow. Seeking out people or sites dedicated to making field recordings would likely be your best path on finding a good mic/pre setup for your needs.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @cfry The background noise includes things like fan and hard drive noises from your computer, white noise that is generated by the mic and its amplifier, and wind noise, if all of these noises are at or near equal in volume to the birdsong, [sigmund~] can not pick them out, even if you can hear them through the noise, our brains are good at filtering out what we do not want to hear. A quick test shows my cheap MXL large diaphragm condenser mic and Behringer interface is sensitive and quiet enough for [sigmund~] to get the crow that is cawwing away right now even with my windows closed, would pickup the quieter birds no problem as well if the windows were open and the wind/waves were not up. [sigmund~] will do the job, but it's output is only as good as its input.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @cfry Laptop mics are meant for nearfield pickup of people/things near the screen and are not sensitive enough to pickup much from any distance, so you increase the gain which also increases background noise and [sigmund~] can not differentiate between the background noise and birdsong any longer. Turning noise reduction back on may help, it might be smart enough to lock in on the birdsong, but a more sensitive microphone and a interface with decent noise specs will do you better.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @whale-av The 3.5mm jack without a resistor would actually add more noise than with it,. The input jack is a switchting type jack, with nothing plugged in the tip and ring is shorted directly to ground, if you just plugged in a bare plug, it would break that short to ground, the plug would become an antenna and while being very short and limited in the wavelengths it could pickup, it would pickup a good deal and certainly more than the Johnson noise of a resistor, if you just plugged in a cable and left the other end unplugged, you would get even more since your antenna is now longer and can pick up longer wavelengths better. A resistor added in, will just resist, those weak RF signals will need to over come that resistance to reach the preamp and be amplified. Johnson noise is a very small factor, it does contribute, but it is not something one would really want to try and exploit as a noise source, a few feet of and wire will give you considerably more. A rather simplified explanation and not completely correct, consider it practical but not technical.

    As an aside, the second ring on the standard tip, ring, ring 3.5 mm plug that we see on phones and anything that can take a headset is powered, those headsets use electret microphones which need some voltage to function. I am not sure what this voltage is, but if you can find a zener diode with a reverse breakdown voltage that is less than the voltage supplied by the jack for a microphone, you could likely build a noise generator into a standard 3.5mm plug with little issue. Zener diodes are generally thought of as poor noise generators, their output level is quite erratic, they are too random to be good noise, but that is great when your needs are random and not pure white noise. There is no real gain to building such a noise source into a plug, just plugging in any cable and leaving the other end floating will do just as well and with less effort.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @deframmentazione-geometrica Some of that noise would also be from the circuitry feeding the ADC, from here we get the noise from the preamp which generally just has its input shorted to ground when nothing is plugged in and still is amplifying anything that manages to get into the circuit, this includes the self noise of the amp, Johnson noise, any RF which manages to get in, ground noise, digital noise seeping into the analog, etc. This is unlikely to be a portable solution since some devices will turn off the ADC itself when nothing is plugged in as a power saving measure, so no noise or clock jitter and some will likewise turn off the preamp when nothing is plugged in, so we loose that source of noise, which is likely the dominant source in most cases.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • oid

    @matchboxyouth the pd floss manual shows how to build a step sequencer, just replace the sliders with toggles, and how to load samples. To do drag and drop I think you would have to delve into data structures. http://write.flossmanuals.net/pure-data/introduction2/

    posted in technical issues read more

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