• oid

    @Cmaj7 This should offer some guidance on making variable shaped curves. https://forum.pdpatchrepo.info/topic/12967/control-domain-waveforms
    I really should update that abstraction, one of my first serious attempts, a little embarrassing in execution but it does the job. Works by doing the line in the 0 to 1 range and then scaling as needed so you can use [pow] to change the curve as just by tweaking the right inlet value, a power of 0.1 gives a square root curve, a power of 2 gives exponential and you can go higher or lower yet.

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  • oid

    @RT-Chris Use the field select inlet and list prepend?
    Untitled.png
    If the list is shortish you can just use unpack

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  • oid

    @Metronome To elaborate on @FFW, you produced a beat frequency. A beat frequency is the difference between the two frequencies, if your frequencies are 110 and 111hz then your beat frequency is 1hz and it will have an effect similar to amplitude modulation with a 1hz LFO because every 1 second the two sinewaves are 180 degrees out of phase, they mostly cancel each other out and then as the phase move away from 180 degrees sound returns. Beat frequencies are one of the things which determine consonance and dissonance in harmony, if the beat frequency of two notes is harmonically related it will sound more consonant, if they are not they will sound more dissonant. Do the simple math to figure the beat frequency of different intervals and compare that frequency to the harmonic series (Fourier series if you prefer) of the root note (the lowest in frequency of the two notes) you will find a very simple and useful relationship and the foundations of harmony and western music theory and well as other traditions, but those others were not quite as deliberate and did not make this the core of their music.

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  • oid

    @jameslo I knew I was missing something. I guess you are just doing from pd what I normally do from the shell. Useful bit of knowledge either way, suspect it will come in handy on occasion.

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  • oid

    @whale-av @jameslo Is there a reason to do these serial lists instead of just [pack f $0]? It seems like it could have some advantages but I can not quite put my finger on it.

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  • oid

    I have found dynamically creating the message to be much more reliable and it has worked consistently for me over the past few years. For reducing the tedium I have found exploiting the plain text format of pd patch files to be much quicker, the shell (bash/tcsh/etc) can do a great deal very quickly, a simple for loop is all it often takes, then just copy and paste the output into your patch or use the command line tools to redirect the output into the appropriate spot. I leave dynamic patching for those times when what is being created is in of itself dynamic, like if the number of v-sliders was variable and set by abstraction arguments.

    Edit: the one time using the shell fails and dynamic patching is easier is when you need to connect with wires, things get ugly quickly, but for objects using send and receive it is not bad at all.

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  • oid

    @svanya It depends on if your sequencer is polyphonic or not, key changes are considerably more complex when dealing with chords, those notes lacking sharps/flats (E, F, B and C) kind of muck of the works and make things difficult and it gets even more difficult when you start adding in things other than the a single scale and once you work out adding in other scales you want to make room for substitutions, sort of a bottomless pit. If you are dealing with monophonic (technically melody and not harmony) than things are fairly easy, a major scale is just three whole steps then a half step, two whole steps then a half, so the math is simple and straight forward, you just need to make sure things follow the whole, whole, whole, half, whole, whole, half pattern or what ever pattern is required for the chosen scale. No idea if this is helpful, knowing some more details about your sequencer will help provide a more concise answer.

    As a side note, it is fairly simple to get the minor scales as well since we can exploit the relative minor of any give key to keep the math simple. Every major scale has a relative minor, this is the same as the sixth (Aeolian) mode, the notes are the same but the distribution of the intervals changes, makes it simple to get both at once. This trick is only useful if you are limiting yourself to just the major and the minor.

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  • oid

    @jameslo Somewhere there is a thread I started and I think we sorted out the escape character logic, or I might have found the answer on the mailing list archives, can not remember. Why are you not just doing something like this? Am I missing something? Just trying to solve the puzzle?
    Untitled.png

    @ingox seems to have just upvoted a post of mine in that old thread, so that may suggest something of worth there. That made it easy to find :)
    https://forum.pdpatchrepo.info/topic/12649/adding-an-escaped-dollar-to-a-message

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  • oid

    @Metronome The simplest way is just to route midi from cakewalk to puredata and audio from puredata to cakewalk. I believe there are some ways to create plugins from puredata patches but they are limited somewhat regarding externals?

    There are also a few DAWs which support loading of puredata patches directly, I believe Ableton does and Radium certainly does.

    posted in output~ read more

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