• ingox

    @raynovich this might help:Screenshot from 2017-06-27 19:54:34.png

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  • ingox

    @jukkapoika if you know the length of the table you could do this:
    Screenshot from 2017-06-21 23:57:09.png
    clear_table.pd

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  • ingox

    @Fauveboy Usually just copy&paste. You can also create objects with dynamic patching, see https://forum.pdpatchrepo.info/topic/10813/collection-of-pd-internal-messages-dynamic-patching.

    Also look at the [clone] object, which might be what you are looking for.

    posted in tutorials read more
  • ingox

    @Fauveboy Yes, you can use [abstraction 1], [abstraction 2] to distinguish different abstractions. And if you are very confident that you will never open up two instances of your patch at the same time, this would be enough. But if you open up two instances somewhere in the future, they will interfere with each other, if you have something like [send $1-something] inside the abstraction.

    i use $0 all the time just to be sure and don't have to worry, but it is up to you. i would for example use [abstraction $0 1], [abstraction $0 2], if the abstractions would need to communicate with the main patch or each other. The important thing here is that every send, receive, text, array and struct get some $0, but this is only if you maybe open two instances at any time at once.

    The other thing is that $-arguments in objects and messages work completely differently. As @whale-av just described while i am typing... ;)

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  • ingox

    @Fauveboy Here another demonstration: dollar-args.zip

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  • ingox

    @Fauveboy [someobject 15 13] <- 15 and 13 are the creation arguments of someobject. Yes, $0 is a four digit number.

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  • ingox

    @pepedlr Pd vanilla compiled from source on linux mint here with dependencies installed as in INSTALL.txt. i have -alsamidi as startup flag (Preferences > Startup...) and with this audio works out of the box.
    For midi i have to start QjackCtl, open "Connect" and connect Pure Data Midi-Out with one of the TiMidity ports. Hope that helps?

    Edit: Also have to add that my jack server is not running when i connect Pd and TiMidity.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • ingox

    @Fauveboy Whatever works for you. The more advanced approach is to put $0 to every send, receive, array, text and struct object so every patch and abstraction is always separated and will never interfere when you for example open the same patch twice. So with this approach everything is separated, because you use the $0 of each abstraction inside the abstraction, which is great.

    But than how can the abstraction communicate with the main patch? The solution is to give the $0 via creation argument down to the abstraction. Than inside the abstraction you know the $0 of the abstraction and the $0 of the main patch.

    For example when you have an array in the main patch which has $0 in its name, you can not access it from within the abstraction because $0 of the main patch is unknown. But you can give the $0 of the main patch as creation argument to the abstraction, so now you can access the array via $1 (if its the first argument) and everything is perfect.

    Here is an example: dollar-zero.zip

    posted in tutorials read more
  • ingox

    @Fauveboy This is because the voicePtest abstractions all send on the same channels. $1 in objects always resolve to the first creation argument of the abstraction. In your case, every voicePtest abstraction has $1 as creation argument which again resolves to the first creation argument of gridSamplerPtest, which is 1.

    So for example [s~ $1-phase] becomes [s~ 1-phase] in each voicePtest abstraction.

    General recommendation: Use $0 as a unique number inside each abstraction. Use creation arguments together with $1, $2 etc. to provide information from the parent to the child abstraction.

    The creation arguments are shown in the title bar and you can do this to find out what is going on:

    [o]    <- this is a bang
    |
    [f $1]
    |
    [print]
    

    and

    [o]    <- this is a bang
    |
    [f $0]
    |
    [print]
    

    The results may be different or not for each abstraction or patch, so this is a way to examine your patch and find out what is going on. And yes, all those $-variables will be just numbers in the end (Although you can also use symbols as creation arguments.).

    posted in tutorials read more
  • ingox

    A collection of many of the messages you can send to Pd to do dynamic patching and other stuff. There are more messages hidden in the tcl source code, but these are the most important:
    pd-msg.zip

    You find an overview in 1.msg_and_patch/0.all_msg.pd inside the zip.

    i tried to find this collection on the web but didn't, so i thought i just post it. <3

    posted in technical issues read more

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