• alexandros

    That's exactly what I was looking for, thanks!

    posted in pixel# read more
  • alexandros

    Messing with ofelia's examples I'm trying to figure out how to send a string arriving via OSC in a Pd patch into ofelia's inlet and display that in its window.
    The examples provided either have hard-coded strings or the stuff displayed are being created inside the Lua script.

    posted in pixel# read more
  • alexandros

    [tabread4~] just reads an array, You feed it an index and it outputs the value at the given index. In more detail, [tabread4~] does a four point interpolation when receiving floats, because these values are in between indexes, since indexes are integers (you don't get an index 1.5). That's all. [phasor~] is multiplied by the size of the array, so it outputs a ramp from 0 to the size of the array, and that is an incrementing index for [tabread4~].

    If you want to add randomness, you can modulate the frequency of [phasor~], or use another oscillator, possibly wihth FM or PM (phase modulation).

    posted in Off topic read more
  • alexandros

    [tabread4~] is not ready made to playback audio. You need something to drive it, and most of the times that's [phasor~]. [phasor~] is a ramp going from 0 to 1 in the frequency specified either as an argument or through input in its left inlet. If you multiply its output by the number of elements of the array [tabread4~] is reading from, then you get whatever is stored in that array. In order to hear it at proper speed, you need to divide your sampling rate by the number of samples of your audio file (the number of elements of the array), and that will be the frequency of the [phasor~].

    So, to answer your 2nd question, [phasor~] is not a sound signal, it's just a ramp which is used as a driving force. If you use another sound signal to drive your playback with [tabread4~], you're going to get a playback with variable speed that will go forward and backward.

    posted in Off topic read more
  • alexandros

    Hi,
    If you're using the default exaples from GitHub, and you're using [serial_print], then you're using a 9600 baud rate. You can change the baud rate to 57600 or 115200 to get better results.
    Bear in mind though that using Serial.print() is significantly slower than Serial.write(), cause the later sends raw bytes, while the former translates everything to its ASCII values. So, if you want to sent the value 100 with Serial.write(), the Arduino will just send one byte, whereas with Serial.print() it will send three bytes, the values 49, 48, 48 (ASCII for 1, 0, 0).

    posted in I/O hardware diyread more
  • alexandros

    Can't you just edit the crontab and open the patch from there with the appropriate flags?
    Type crontab -e which will prompt you to choose an editor (nano will be the default, better use that one). Scroll to the end of the file and type this:
    @reboot sleep 20 ; pd -nogui -audiodev 3 -open /path/to/patch.pd &
    This will force the Pi to launch Pd without the GUI, choose the third audio device (first is Pi's default audio hardware, second is default audio plugin, third should be any sound card connected as hardware), and open your patch. The ampersand (&) tells the Pi to run Pd in the background so you can still do things with it in the terminal.

    Once you type this, hit Ctl+O to save the file and hit return as you'll be asked to save the changed you made. I'm pretty sure this will work.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • alexandros

    Thanks for making this, it's an amazing library!

    posted in news read more
  • alexandros

    What does Arduino's power supply have to do with the current the relay will let through or not? A relay is an electronic switch which receives power (usually of high voltage) and has three more pins, one for 5V, one for ground, and one to control the actual switch. These three pins are the ones you connect to the Arduino, and Arduino's 5V pin is more than enough to power the digital part of the relay. The high voltage the relay will let through or not has nothing to do with Arduino's power supply and digital control.

    Don't know what you're trying to do, and can't really understand the conversation, but thought I post these couple of things I know about relays.

    posted in I/O hardware diyread more
  • alexandros

    Why would you damage the boards? I don't think relays have changed in the way they work, since 2011. What is this that you find and don't trust?

    posted in I/O hardware diyread more
  • alexandros

    Try this:

    [phasor~ 1]
    |
    [threshold~ 0.1 10 0.1 10]
                             |
                            [o]
    

    The bottom object is a bang

    posted in technical issues read more

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