• jancsika

    I've never heard of it. What is it supposed to do?

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  • jancsika

    Strangly I don't need to [include chaos], that simply does not work...

    Did you mean [declare -lib chaos]?

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  • jancsika

    @skautkurt Try running with the "-verbose" flag and tell me what it prints to the console before the chaos: can't load library message.

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  • jancsika

    @JJLloyd I haven't run into this. Can you give me the steps to reproduce the bug?

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  • jancsika

    Thanks for the report-- I'll check this out.

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  • jancsika

    Sorry about that. I'm working on getting a new ARM version of nw.js building. If I can get that up and running I'll update it for the other archs.

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  • jancsika

    Btw-- here's a nice article that outlines some of the common hash table terminology in the context of realtime embedded systems:

    http://users.cs.northwestern.edu/~sef318/docs/hashtables.pdf

    The discussion about performance as the number of keys per bucket increases is particularly relevant. Same with the desire for the ratio between the worst-case and average performance to approach one.

    It's also instructive to notice the difference in complexity between the simplistic approach Pd uses and their proposed realtime-safe memory-constrained approach. Pd's algo is simple enough that you can read the code and understand what it does straightaway. In fact I'm not sure anyone has ever done the most basic testing on it, or even checked to make sure that it distributes keys uniformly across the buckets (though I assume it does). Yet people seem to be able to use Pd in performances, even large complex patches, without symbol table growth becoming a performance bottleneck.

    Edit: to be fair, most users aren't doing things like text processing of arbitrary input during performance. So the limitations of the core language may work to keep users from ever hitting that limit. But I think if you had a big patch with thousands of abstractions containing lots of "$0-"-prefixed symbols inside them you might be able to experience the problem.

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  • jancsika

    In Purr Data I can specify size 10 font and then zoom in two levels to get a box that is larger than size 12 font but smaller than size 16. At that setting the inlets are about 2 pixels wider and some amount taller, too.

    Size 10 font is the default in Pd Vanilla and is readable.

    If that is workable it might be preferable to changing the hard-coded xlet width. Because if you change the hard-coded xlet width which then nice-looking straight line connections in your patches will not be straight-line connections on everyone else's screen.

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  • jancsika

    Why can't you just zoom in on the patch?

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  • jancsika

    @Jona 100000 keys means a linear search on the average of 100 keys. And that's where each iteration is mostly just comparing symbol pointers (not creating symbols nor doing symbol lookup) so it's quite fast.

    [text] is just a wrapper around Pd's main message storage format. That format is very simple. If you wanted to add a hashmap you'd need an additional structure to map the symbol hash to a line number. (And some helper functions to keep track of that mapping.)

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