• alexandros

    A decent ADC for the Pi is indeed something pretty hard to find. I've been using a Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 which I've ripped off its case and put it in my project's housing, and it works fine. This requires some hardware hacking though as you'll might need to remove some parts from the sound card's circuit board (like potentiometers) in order to bring them to the desired position in your setup.

    posted in I/O hardware diyread more
  • alexandros

    From DmxMaster library SerialToDmx example:

    #include <DmxMaster.h>
    
    void setup() {
      Serial.begin(9600);
      Serial.println("SerialToDmx ready");
      Serial.println();
      Serial.println("Syntax:");
      Serial.println(" 123c : use DMX channel 123");
      Serial.println(" 45w : set current channel to value 45");
    }
    
    int value = 0;
    int channel;
    
    void loop() {
      int c;
    
      while(!Serial.available());
      c = Serial.read();
      if ((c>='0') && (c<='9')) {
        value = 10*value + c - '0';
      } else {
        if (c=='c') channel = value;
        else if (c=='w') {
          DmxMaster.write(channel, value);
          Serial.println();
        }
        value = 0;
      }
    }
    

    In Pd send the message "print 1c255w" to [comport] to write the value 255 to DMX channel 1. That should work.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • alexandros

    Can't watch the video right now cause Youtube is throwing a playback error. I've used an Arduino UNO along with the DMX-master shield and library from Tinkerkit, but I think this shield is not being produced any more... This is their google code page https://code.google.com/archive/p/tinkerit/wikis/DmxSimple.wiki it's for the DMX-simple, but it's pretty similar to the master.
    You can make a DMX circuit with the max-something IC, but can't remember right now.
    What are the issues you're facing?

    posted in technical issues read more
  • alexandros

    Another solution would be the [shell] object from the ggee library, which should be available via apt-get install for the Pi. You can execute your Python scripts through [shell] and get their output by calling Python's print function and receiving it via [shell]'s left outlet.

    posted in technical issues read more
  • alexandros

    I've been using the Odroid to create a modular synthesizer programmed in Pd and Arduino. I've finally made it but haven't made documentation yet, it will come in the next month or so.
    Another option is of course the very popular Raspberry Pi. You'll need an external sound card to get Pd's audio outputs into the real world. If your sound card has at least three inputs and outputs (which is not the most common thing, IMHO) then you're probably good to go. Otherwise you'll have to implement some sort of physical patching that can be translated into Pd language. One good example is the rePatcher by Open Music Labs. This is what I based my synthesizer on and turned it into a modular synth.

    Depending on what you want to do there can be different approaches, but I would recommend starting off with a Raspberry Pi and an Arduino.

    posted in I/O hardware diyread more
  • alexandros

    @OJO This means that the repositories of your Linux distribution have an outdated version of Pd, which is what you get with apt-get install.
    If you want to get the latest version (and you probably should get it), go to Miller's website and download the source, then compile after you make sure you have all the necessary dependencies (check the INSTALL.txt file).

    posted in technical issues read more
  • alexandros

    Though I tried the same patch in purr-data and it doesn't work the same way it does on vanilla. don't really know why, I'm not using purr-data anyway.

    posted in this forum read more
  • alexandros

    On purr-data I did [declare -lib iemmatrix] and then put a [matrix] object instead, not a [mtx] and it worked. Try it.

    posted in this forum read more
  • alexandros

    Since what you need is indeed a matrix, I guess [mtx] from the iemmatrix library would be the best solution. The image below shows a basic use of [mtx]:
    matrix.png

    posted in this forum read more
  • alexandros

    sudo nano /etc/security/limits.conf
    This will ask you for your user password and will open the file in nano. nano is a text editor that opens up in the terminal. It's very easy to use, you'll probably find sufficient sources about it online.
    Note that this is not for Jack. If you've installed Jack with real-time priority, then there should be another file, /etc/security/limits.d/audio.conf or something like this. You should probably edit this file as well, writing the same stuff at the end of it, as you did with /etc/security/limits.conf

    posted in technical issues read more

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